Aron C. Beezley, co-leader of the firm’s Government Contracts Practice Group and a partner in the Washington, D.C. office, has been named a 2022 Law360 MVP of the Year winner in the Government Contracts category.

The 12th annual Law360 MVP Awards recognize attorneys across the country who have distinguished themselves from their peers by making

As many in the construction industry are aware, owners and lenders often require prime contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers to execute sworn statements and lien waiver and release forms as a prerequisite to payment. Many states therefore see it fit to regulate — in varying degrees — what those forms say and look like. Forms that

Today, President Biden signed into law  H.R. 5376, referred to as the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA). The nearly $369 billion of new spending is intended to transform entire sectors of the American economy and will have profound consequences across the clean energy landscape, including for manufacturers, developers, owner-operators, utilities and investors. Bradley has been actively

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) recently issued a final rule that provides two new methods for small business government contractors to obtain past performance ratings to be used in support of offers on prime contracts with the federal government. The purpose of the rule is to address a common problem faced by small businesses

Any time a contractor receives a notice to cure, it should tread carefully and review its contract to determine its response. Recently, the Georgia Court of Appeals evaluated a case in which the general contractor terminated the subcontractor’s contract for failure to provide adequate labor to the project. The court determined that the general contractor

How can a contractor, subcontractor, or supplier secure payment for its work? One solution is to file a mechanics’ lien against a project’s property.

Lien laws vary widely from state to state and time to time because contractors and subcontractors frequently seek to change them – California is no exception. One particularly significant rule is

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) recently issued a final rule adopting a 24-month — as opposed to the current 12-month — average to calculate a business’s number of employees for eligibility purposes in all SBA programs that contain employee-based size standards. SBA’s new rule — which takes effect July 6, 2022 — is discussed