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Finding out what’s best for the client has been David Taylor’s approach to practicing law for more than 30 years. David chairs the firm’s construction group in its Nashville office, and has for over 30 years been a commercial litigator, with an emphasis on construction and real estate dispute resolution. David has a national construction practice representing all participants in the construction industry, and is recognized as one of the leading construction lawyers in Tennessee and the southeast. View articles by David

I have practiced law for 40 years, with the vast majority as a “construction” lawyer. I have seen great… and bad construction lawyering, both when on the other side of a dispute, as well as when serving over 300 times as a mediator or arbitrator in construction disputes. To be clear, I have made my

I have practiced law for 40 years, with the vast majority of that time spent as a “construction lawyer.” I have seen great… and bad… construction lawyering, both when on the other side of a dispute, as well as when serving well over 300 times as a mediator or arbitrator in construction disputes. To be

I have practiced law for 40 years, with the vast majority spent as a “construction lawyer.” I have seen great… and bad… construction lawyering, both when on the other side of a dispute, as well as when serving well over 300 times as a mediator or arbitrator in construction disputes. To be clear, I have

Here’s the Scenario: Try explaining the concept of “retainage” to a businessperson unfamiliar with the construction industry at your next holiday party. Here’s the typical response as she spits out her eggnog: “Wait a minute: are you telling me that when work and materials timely supplied on a private commercial project are approved, the contractor

Here’s the Scenario: After months of working with a new national developer (and providing hours of unreimbursed value engineering), you get the draft prime contract and see that the named “owner” will not be the hugely successful developer, but a specially created “limited liability company” that’s sole “asset” is the land upon which the project

Here’s the Scenario:

After months of working with a new developer client (and providing hours of unreimbursed value engineering) and hard negotiations over the cost plus GMP contract (fighting over indemnity/escalation/savings/liquidated damage clauses), you have a deal. You pop a cork with all involved since the developer has said this is one of many

Construction law is NOT boring, at least that’s what I tell my daughters. In these series of posts, I will explore some of the VERY interesting historical facts about construction law that can be used at your next motion hearing, family gathering, social event or fellow lawyer meeting.  While these anecdotes may not keep your

Lawyer’s Advocacy in Arbitrations: No. 10 of the Top 10 Horrible, Terrible, No Good Mistakes Lawyers Make: Not Looking for Ways to Make Your Arbitrator Happy at the End of a HearingDavid K. Taylor, Bradley Arant Boult Cummings, Nashville, TN
dtaylor@bradley.com
615-252-2396

There’s a great argument that lawyer advocacy in an arbitration is more essential than at a trial in court. This is the last post of the 10 most horrible, terrible, no good, “bang your head against the door” mistakes that I have seen lawyers

Lawyer’s Advocacy in Arbitrations: No. 9 of the Top 10 Horrible, Terrible, No Good Mistakes Lawyers Make: Be Creative with Proof and IssuesDavid K. Taylor, Bradley Arant Boult Cummings, Nashville, TN
dtaylor@bradley.com
615-252-2396

There’s a great argument that lawyer advocacy in an arbitration is more essential than at a trial in court. This post is the ninth of the top 10 most horrible, terrible, no good, “bang your head against the door” mistakes that I have seen

Lawyer’s Advocacy in Arbitrations: No. 8 of the Top 10 Horrible, Terrible, No Good Mistakes Lawyers Make: Get the Hearing Exhibit Books RightDavid K. Taylor, Bradley Arant Boult Cummings, Nashville, TN
dtaylor@bradley.com
615-252-2396

There’s a great argument that lawyer advocacy in an arbitration is more essential than at a trial in court. This post is the eighth of the 10 most horrible, terrible, no good, “bang your head against the door” mistakes that I have seen lawyers