Miller Act Suit Stayed until CDA Remedies ExhaustedA federal district court in Washington recently rejected a subcontractor’s motion for reconsideration of a previously granted motion to stay in a Miller Act lawsuit (the Miller Act governs prime contractor bond requirements on federal projects and sets forth remedies against the bond for subcontractors, vendors, and suppliers on such projects). In United States of

Coverage for Defective Work? Michigan Joins MajorityMichigan has joined the majority of jurisdictions in holding that a general liability policy may provide coverage for claims for property damage allegedly caused by the defective work of a subcontractor. In a unanimous decision reversing the Michigan Court of Appeals, the Michigan Supreme Court held that a subcontractor’s unintentional defective work was an “accident”

An Insurer’s Duty to Defend does not Extend to a Construction Claim that Falls Clearly Within a Policy ExclusionLike most states, Florida follows the rule that an insurer’s duty to defend is separate from and broader than its duty to indemnify for a potentially covered occurrence. Last week, in South Winds Construction Corp. v. Preferred Contractors Insurance Company Risk Retention Group, LLC, a Florida appellate court addressed the extent of that duty

Recent Court Order Excluding Expert Testimony Offers Useful Reminders and Lessons for Construction LitigantsConstruction claims often feature supporting testimony from design and/or scheduling experts, and exclusion of that testimony either by disqualification of the expert or a finding that the testimony is otherwise inadmissible can prove fatal to your claim or defense. States may vary in their requirements for admissibility of expert evidence, but most states follow some

Broad “Assumption of Liability” Clause in Subcontract Likely Trumps “Waiver of Subrogation” Clause in Prime ContractIn a recent case handled by Bradley, a federal court in Maryland issued a decision attempting to reconcile inconsistent contract provisions.

The general contractor said that its fire sprinkler subcontractor was responsible for the burst sprinkler pipe and the resulting property damage based on the “Assumption of Liability” provision in the subcontract, which stated that

Contractors Beware: Subcontractor Exception to “Your Work” Exclusion May Not Save the Day

Commercial general liability (CGL) coverage for a general contractor is not guaranteed, even if property damage is all a subcontractor’s fault. Consider the following example: A general contractor builds a stadium for which a subcontractor builds the frame. After the project is complete, a wall collapses. An independent investigation reveals the subcontractor’s defective framing work